Welcome to our community.

In this community, you can submit ideas, vote on existing ideas, or add comments.

To submit an idea, please click the Submit New Idea button at the top of the navigation sidebar. You will then be asked to add a title and choose a campaign for the new idea. You will also have the option to add tags to the idea. To vote on an idea, simply click the up or down arrows to the right of the idea title/description. And to add a comment, click in the box below the idea.

If you would like to see all ideas created with a specific tag, you can click on the word or phrase via the tagcloud in the navigation sidebar area under "What we're discussing". You can also view ideas sorted by Campaigns from the right navigation area. To return to this page, click the All Ideas link.

Preparedness Policy and Guidance

Teach Practical Family Nuclear Civil Defense Strategies and Tactics...

The disarmament movement for decades has hyped that with nukes; all will die or it will be so bad you'll wish you had. Most have bought into it, now thinking it futile, bordering on lunacy, to try to learn how to survive a nuclear blast and radioactive fallout. Unfortunately, most govt officials have, too, as they are focused on #1- Interdiction, and #2- COG (Continuity of Govt) for when #1 fails, and have largely ignored ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

Policy Leaders need Appropriate Training

One of the most critical gaps we have in our overall preparedness, especially in small local governments, is the lack of training for elected officials and other policy group members. Too often we just expect them to make appropraite policy decisions in times of emergency, but we do not train them what those appropriate decisions are. As my project for the Master Trainer Program at EMI I am attempting to address this ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

EMS and the emergency care system needs to have a seat at the planning table

As I reviewed the proposed membership of the Task Force, I have noted the glaring absence of representation from the emergency medical services (EMS) community and emergency physicians. EMS providers and emergency physicians are the members of the emergency care system who will play key primary roles in a disaster response, regardless of its etiology. Although I commend the inclusion of firefighters, the specific designation ...more »

Submitted by

Preparedness Grant Programs and Incentives

Support Hiring of Local Emergency Management Personnel

Allow for State and local juridictions to use UASI and SHSGP funds to hire emergency managers. Currently, only Intelligence Analysts can be hired and paid through UASI and SHSGP funds. Emergency Managers can only be hired through EMPG, but that is a much smaller grant that not all jurisdictions receive. In an All-Hazards context, emergency managers are far more important than intelligence analysts, so it would be a great ...more »

Submitted by

Private Sector Preparedness

Workplace CERT

Develop a business CERT curriculum. Most people spend the better part of their waking hours at work. Beyond the nearly non-existant "fire brigades" or "floor monitors" and empty first aid kits little is being done to prepare people in the business environment for disaster. Just as Teen CERT and Campus CERT have their own curriculum I believe that a new curriculum for the business environment is needed.

Submitted by

General Preparedness

Private Sector Representation

I think that it ould be very imporatnt to include private sector representatives from the critical infrastructure groups who are charged with emergency management and contingency planning. I spent over 28 years in state law enforcement and found that the communication process, although improved over that time frame, was very lacking between government and key private industry stakeholders. As the person responsible ...more »

Submitted by

Preparedness Capabilities and Assessments

Understanding Risk and Vulnerabilities is Critical

It seems so often that we fail to complete a comprehensive community all hazard risk assessment, that includes the nature, vulnerabilities, probability, consequences, and severity. Agencies complain that it is too hard; if they would leverage existing data and institutional knowledge, it is do-able. I have seen it provide an incredibly solid footing to begin designing and implementing mitigation strategies.

Submitted by

General Preparedness

General Aviation Pilots Flying Disaster Response & Recovery Missions

There is an untapped source of manpower and equipment that has never been organized and used. There are over 632,649 pilots and 376,985 General Aviation (private) airplanes in the US and D.C. Some States can brag they have an aviation unit at the State level, such as an "Air Operations Branch", but nothing beneath it to control. To my knowledge, it has never been tried before to organize General Aviation pilots to ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

AM & FM Radio Stations as a Preparedness Tool

While the Emergency Alert System is in place to provide warning of an imminent threat and for follow up during an emergency, radio chould play a more significant preparedness role. It's portability, pervasiveness, the the fact that it can be listened to my millions simultaneously without degrading the speed of delivery (unlike the Internet), make it an overlooked resource for preparedness. A system, perhaps modeled ...more »

Submitted by

Preparedness Policy and Guidance

Support ALL levels of Incident Management Teams

Provide funding, oversight and guidance for all levels of incident management teams. Develop a national system of training and certification for Types I, II, and III teams. Smaller Type III incidents may cross state boundaries, but because certifications are set up by each state, other states don't have to honor them, complicating the response. It could also make the transition from Type III to Type II more efficient. ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

Eductional Institutions

Whatever work is being done, whether at the local, state, or federal level, it must include educational institutions as an participant. Often, educational institutions have tremendous resource pools that will assist with all areas of preparing for, responding too, and recovering from incidents and will posses some of greatest risk potentials. Nation-wide, there is a push to incorporate private sector assistance ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

Resource Typing and Credential to support Inter and Intra State Mutual Aid

Support inter- and intra-state mutual aid by assisting states/regions/local communities with funding and technical assistance to type resources and credential personnel in responder disciplines (all appropriate for response; not just governmental). Work towards an interactive resource information and request system to shorten and sustain response to a disaster or catastrophic event. Strive to align the EMAC Mission Packages ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

Stimulate a Community Grassroots Education Effort

I suggest that government and large corporations offer grant funding to local organizations that would stimulate a grassroots response to community disaster education and resilience. This initiative would focus on recruiting volunteers (retired, self-employed, etc.) to teach community disaster education and disaster resilience through the churches and other faith-based organizations, schools, and civic organizations in ...more »

Submitted by

Preparedness Policy and Guidance

Improve Emergency Planning Process

Develop and implement a professional career track for emergency planners. Ten years ago in North Carolina, we had one all-hazards plan and one hazard-specific one (hurricanes). Today we still have the one base plan and 15 hazard-specific ones. During this period, EM planning postions dropped from 14 to 9. Other state agencies have increased their preparedness planning, but we do not have a standard planning process. ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

Better training for EOC functions

ICS doctrine has a problem with using standard ICS in EOCs, and AHIMT classes have no meaningful content on EOC integration (and the one FEMA class on ICS/EOC integration does not add much). The Planning function in and EOC may have the same purpose as that at an incident, but the practice is very different; ditto Logs and Ops (or what functions under "Ops" in an EOC: prioritizing resource allocation for field incidents). ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

CERT to train families for preparedness

CERT teams should conduct SEVERAL family preparedness meetings in the community at schools, churches (maybe link with ministerial alliance folks) and fire houses. These meetings would present family and individual preparedness topics to include fire safety and having a fire plan for the family, but also being prepared for disasters, communication plans, etc. Partner with local hardware stores to publish lists of materials ...more »

Submitted by

Preparedness Policy and Guidance

Require interoperable radio policies

Require agencies that have access to interoperable radio systems to include their use in their written policies. I work as a police/fire dispatcher for a local agency in Colorado. I'm a big fan of our radio system. The mutual aid channels are set up well and easy to understand. Working in the Denver metro area, I have the ability to communicate with any agency in the state. The big problem is that we have the technology, ...more »

Submitted by

General Preparedness

Funding Streams

It is unreasonable to assume that the myriad of agencies within a region will effectively work together when each agency has its own and sometimes multiple funding streams, and each funding stream has its own set of extensive requirements. The Federal Government needs to evaluate a funding stream that creates an incentive for all actors in a region to work collaboratively instead of operating like silos. "A row of silos ...more »

Submitted by

Displaying 1 - 25 of 266 Ideas