Preparedness Policy and Guidance

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Teach Practical Family Nuclear Civil Defense Strategies and Tactics...

The disarmament movement for decades has hyped that with nukes; all will die or it will be so bad you'll wish you had. Most have bought into it, now thinking it futile, bordering on lunacy, to try to learn how to survive a nuclear blast and radioactive fallout. Unfortunately, most govt officials have, too, as they are focused on #1- Interdiction, and #2- COG (Continuity of Govt) for when #1 fails, and have largely ignored ...more »

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134 votes
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General Preparedness

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Policy Leaders need Appropriate Training

One of the most critical gaps we have in our overall preparedness, especially in small local governments, is the lack of training for elected officials and other policy group members. Too often we just expect them to make appropraite policy decisions in times of emergency, but we do not train them what those appropriate decisions are. As my project for the Master Trainer Program at EMI I am attempting to address this ...more »

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70 votes
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Private Sector Preparedness

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Workplace CERT

Develop a business CERT curriculum. Most people spend the better part of their waking hours at work. Beyond the nearly non-existant "fire brigades" or "floor monitors" and empty first aid kits little is being done to prepare people in the business environment for disaster. Just as Teen CERT and Campus CERT have their own curriculum I believe that a new curriculum for the business environment is needed.

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46 votes
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Preparedness Grant Programs and Incentives

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Support Hiring of Local Emergency Management Personnel

Allow for State and local juridictions to use UASI and SHSGP funds to hire emergency managers. Currently, only Intelligence Analysts can be hired and paid through UASI and SHSGP funds. Emergency Managers can only be hired through EMPG, but that is a much smaller grant that not all jurisdictions receive. In an All-Hazards context, emergency managers are far more important than intelligence analysts, so it would be a great ...more »

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48 votes
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General Preparedness

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EMS and the emergency care system needs to have a seat at the planning table

As I reviewed the proposed membership of the Task Force, I have noted the glaring absence of representation from the emergency medical services (EMS) community and emergency physicians. EMS providers and emergency physicians are the members of the emergency care system who will play key primary roles in a disaster response, regardless of its etiology. Although I commend the inclusion of firefighters, the specific designation ...more »

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53 votes
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General Preparedness

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Private Sector Representation

I think that it ould be very imporatnt to include private sector representatives from the critical infrastructure groups who are charged with emergency management and contingency planning. I spent over 28 years in state law enforcement and found that the communication process, although improved over that time frame, was very lacking between government and key private industry stakeholders. As the person responsible ...more »

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40 votes
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General Preparedness

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Get faith-based orgs involved

I suggest you...start including the faith-based organizations in educating citizens about the need to set up a plan, a kit and a mindset. People usually believe what they hear in church and if the pastors/mentors etc. join in the 'chorus' of preparedness it would add some credibility that does not now exist.

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35 votes
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General Preparedness

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Training and exercising

Regular training and exercising is needed at all levels - government, volunteers, and community. Having people involved once a year or so, is not enough - we need to find a way to make things more available, online as well as hands on to keep people up on their skills and keep them interested.

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37 votes
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Preparedness Capabilities and Assessments

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Understanding Risk and Vulnerabilities is Critical

It seems so often that we fail to complete a comprehensive community all hazard risk assessment, that includes the nature, vulnerabilities, probability, consequences, and severity. Agencies complain that it is too hard; if they would leverage existing data and institutional knowledge, it is do-able. I have seen it provide an incredibly solid footing to begin designing and implementing mitigation strategies.

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39 votes
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